By Jane Wolery, MSU Extension Teton County Agent

 

Jane Wolery, MSU Extension Teton Co. Agent (Photo: MSU/Gorham)

The Montana State University (MSU) Center for Mental Health Research and Recovery is collaborating with MSU Extension and One Montana to evaluate an interactive, computerized Cognitive Behavior Therapy (cCBT) program designed to improve mood and reduce anxiety symptoms. Project leaders hope to recruit hundreds of Montanans for the study.

The cCBT program, called Thrive, has an interactive, video-based interface designed to respond to input from individual users and provide guidance in areas that each user deems important in his or her life. In other places in the US, the Thrive program has been shown to decrease the frequency of depressive and anxiety symptoms and improve users’ quality of life. Multiple prior randomized controlled trials have shown that similar cCBT programs are effective for depressive and anxiety symptoms. This study will evaluate the ability of Thrive to reduce depressive and anxiety symptoms and suicidal thoughts.

To be eligible to join the study, one must be a current Montana adult resident, have regular access to broadband internet, and have depressive symptoms that are at least mild. Interested individuals can determine their eligibility to join the study by going to https://thriveformontana.com and answering a few questions. If eligible, participants may automatically enroll in the study and will be assigned to either receive the Thrive program immediately, or for those randomly assigned to the control group, eight weeks after starting the study.

Participants will be asked to complete brief online questionnaires. Participants will receive reminders by emails with directions on how to access the assessment portal online. Participants will receive a $10 Amazon gift voucher for each completed questionnaire starting at 4 weeks after enrollment.

For further information about the THRIVE Research Project, please contact research staff at: msuthrive@montana.edu or call (406)994-1603.